Dinosaur Fossils

Dinosaur Fossils for sale

Regaliceratops-peterhewsi

A side view of the newfound Triceratops relative, Regaliceratops peterhewsi.
Credit: Sue Sabrowski. Source

This year, paleontologists made headlines with news of incredible dinosaur findings the world over, and they expect 2016 will hold just as many surprises, scientists told Live Science.

For instance, researchers rocked headlines in 2015 with the discoveries of fossils showing a feathered batlike dinosaur (likely a failed attempt at early dinosaur flight, scientists told Live Science), a mysterious herbivorous cousin of Tyrannosaurus rex and a herd of duck-billed dinosaurs living in the chilly reaches of ancient Alaska.

“Part of the fun of paleontology is that you can’t really predict what’s coming down the road,” said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in Claremont, California. [Photos: Oldest Known Horned Dinosaur in North America]

As in years past, paleontologists will continue to scour ancient rock for dinosaur fossils.“We’re still in a discovery phase of the science, and I don’t see that ending anytime soon,” said Steve Brusatte, a paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh. “People are still finding a new dinosaur once every week or two, on average.”

Each finding helps scientists piece together the puzzle of dinosaur evolution and distribution, he said.

Researchers are also re-examining known fossils. Some specimens haven’t been described in detail, making it difficult for experts to learn about anatomical features and how they relate to those of other animals, Farke said.

For instance, a study published in December in the journal PeerJ described an in-depth reexamination of an ankylosaur fossil discovered in Australia in 1989. The researchers’ new analysis determined that the specimen belonged to a new genus and species of ankylosaur, prompting the name Kunbarrasaurus ieversi.

Re-examining known fossils isn’t “ridiculously glamorous,” Farke said, but “when you get a long paper published that has all the detailed figures, text and comparisons, that’s what can really move the field forward.”

This year, paleontologists made headlines with news of incredible dinosaur findings the world over, and they expect 2016 will hold just as many surprises, scientists told Live Science.

For instance, researchers rocked headlines in 2015 with the discoveries of fossils showing a feathered batlike dinosaur (likely a failed attempt at early dinosaur flight, scientists told Live Science), a mysterious herbivorous cousin of Tyrannosaurus rex and a herd of duck-billed dinosaurs living in the chilly reaches of ancient Alaska.

“Part of the fun of paleontology is that you can’t really predict what’s coming down the road,” said Andrew Farke, a paleontologist at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in Claremont, California.
Fossils galore

Just as in years past, paleontologists will continue to scour ancient rock for dinosaur fossils.
“We’re still in a discovery phase of the science, and I don’t see that ending anytime soon,” said Steve Brusatte, a paleontologist at the University of Edinburgh. “People are still finding a new dinosaur once every week or two, on average.”

Each finding helps scientists piece together the puzzle of dinosaur evolution and distribution, he said.

Researchers are also re-examining known fossils. Some specimens haven’t been described in detail, making it difficult for experts to learn about anatomical features and how they relate to those of other animals, Farke said.

For instance, a study published in December in the journal PeerJ described an in-depth reexamination of an ankylosaur fossil discovered in Australia in 1989. The researchers’ new analysis determined that the specimen belonged to a new genus and species of ankylosaur, prompting the name Kunbarrasaurus ieversi.

Re-examining known fossils isn’t “ridiculously glamorous,” Farke said, but “when you get a long paper published that has all the detailed figures, text and comparisons, that’s what can really move the field forward.”

Source

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